Piso Perturbatus: A compelling storyline for an early Novice reader.

The Piso-verse is a must addition to any Latin reading library.  I find myself at Magister P’s website often as I progress toward providing more comprehensible input in my classroom.  One of the 1st Novellas I purchased was Piso Ille Poetulus.  My curriculum director bought a class set and I set off reading it as an introduction to poetry in my Latin 3 class.  Honestly, the results were mixed but I think that had as much to do with being in the middle of transitioning my program from a reading method philosophy entrenched in legacy practices as it did with the Piso text.  I look forward to making it a regular class read in my level 3 in the future.

I’ve purchased at least 1 copy of all the Piso-verse texts.  Unfortunately, I currently only have 1 copy of Piso Perturbatus as multiple students in each level want to read it.  In my take on FVR as Self Directed Reading, I’ve categorized Piso Perturbatus as a level A title, which means even a Novice Mid level student should be able to read it for understanding without looking up too many words.  Students seem to prefer Piso Perturbatus over Rufus et Arma Atra and Rufus Lutulentus which I also categorize in the level A.

Recently, during one on one conferences with students to learn more about their reading I’ve asked a few why they choose Piso Perturbatus over the Rufus titles.  Most have said something about how they enjoy what they view as conflict between Piso and his father.  Piso wants to be a poet but his father, among many others, wants him to be a soldier like most Roman boys.  It’s interesting that students are drawn to that over the Rufus titles which take students to different places in Rome.

Magister P has affordable FVR and class set packages, but even on their own, these titles are affordable.  I recommend all of them but if you have to choose just one for a Novice level student, Piso Perturbatus adds an element of conflict that students seem to find compelling that the Rufus titles lack.

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